Fire Behavior Risk in Late Frost Gambel Oak

Fire Behavior Risk in Late Frost Gambel Oak

Significant frost kill is present in the Gambel Oak as a result of late May freezes that took place after leaf budding began. Areas affected include an elevation range of 6000'-9200' along the Western slope of Colorado.Significant frost kill is present in the Gambel Oak as a result of late May freezes that took place after leaf budding began. Areas affected include an elevation range of 6000'-9200' along the Western slope of Colorado.

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Gambel Oak Ecology and Management in the Southern Rockies: The Status of Our Knowledge

 Gambel Oak Ecology and Management in the Southern Rockies: the Status of our Knowledge

This publication is an outcome of field discussions held between agency managers, researchers, and university scientists to bring together existing research and publications as well as current management knowledge, then combined with the authors' field and career observations. Subsequent collaboration between the Rocky Mountain Research Station, The Nature Conservancy, Utah State University, the US Forest Service, Bureau of Land Management, and the Southern Rockies Fire Science Network resulted in literature searches, workshops, and research on the current body of knowledge regarding Gambel oak in the central Rockies, with a geographic focus on Colorado and Utah. This publication identifies nine key points summarizing the current status of our scientific understanding of Gambel oak in this region.

Save the Date! Bridging the Divide: Managing Forests Into the Future (9/9 - 9/10)

This event is the third in a series of workshops to address wildfire, watersheds, and future forests and is geared towards managers, scientists, and communities. 

Join representatives of: the Rio Grande Watershed Emergency Coordination Action Team (RWEACT-WIN), San Juan Headwaters Forest Health Partnership, Southwest Firewise, Southern Rockies Fire Science Network, and the Rio Grande and San Juan National Forests.

Eat, Prepare, & Discuss:

  • How will our forests change?
  • What do changing forests mean for water?
  • How can our communities prepare for the future?

For more info, contact Aaron Kimple at akimple@mountainstudies.org